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A Voice for Justice and Peace in Israel/Palestine

Op-ed in Haaretz: Christian leaders cannot be cowed into silence over Israel’s abuses of human rights

Posted by rabbibrian on October 31, 2012

Haaretz has just published an op-ed that I wrote about the courageous decision by several Christian churches calling on the US to condition aid to Israel on compliance with American law.  You will find a copy of the article below.  Feel free to share with others and I would value hearing your response.  

I hope to write more about the extraordinary trip to the West Bank with civil and human rights leaders that I refer to in the article.  We returned a week ago from a two week trip to the West Bank.  It was an extraordinary trip with an inspiring group of moral heroes, people who have spent years working nonviolently for justice and freedom.  It was such a privilege to be travelling with people like Vincent Harding and Dorothy Cotton.   It was also the first time in my life that I have spent more than a day or two on the West Bank.  Living with people under military occupation was disturbing and eye opening.  We met so many inspiring Palestinian nonviolent activists who have been working for years to achieve justice and dignity.  Witnessing the encounter between them and the African Americans on our delegation who have been long time freedom activists was truly a blessing. 

Here is the link.    (You may need a subscription to open this link.)
 
 
Here is a copy of the article: 
 

Christian leaders cannot be cowed into silence over Israel’s abuses of human rights

Eric Yoffie’s criticism of the Protestant churches’ letter to Congress is misplaced: The price of ‘interfaith dialogue’ cannot be silenced by Christian leaders on Israel’s human rights violations, evidence of which I saw firsthand in a recent visit to the West Bank.

By Rabbi Brian Walt | Oct.31, 2012 | 5:54 PM |  7

In his recent Haaretz op-ed, “Heading toward an irreparable rift between U.S. Jews and Protestants,” my colleague, Rabbi Eric Yoffie, sharply criticized the recent letter to Congress by leaders of Protestant churches that called for U.S. military aid to Israel to be contingent on Israeli compliance with American law. Nowhere in his article, however, did Yoffie mention the central concern of the Christian leaders’ letter: the overwhelming evidence of systematic human rights violations by the Israeli military against Palestinians.

Over the past two weeks, I had the privilege of leading an interfaith delegation including several leaders of the civil rights movement, younger civil and human rights leaders, Christian clergy, academics, and several Jews, on a two-week trip to the West Bank.

We were all shocked by the widespread human rights violations that we saw with our own eyes and that we heard about from both Palestinians and Israelis. Several black members of our group, including those who participated actively in the civil rights movement, remarked that what they saw on the West Bank was “frighteningly familiar” to their own experience, a systemic pattern of discrimination that privileged one group (in this case, Jews) and denigrated another (Palestinians).

Together we walked down Shuhadah Street in Hebron, a street restricted to Jews and foreigners where Hebron’s Palestinians are mostly not allowed to walk, even those Palestinians who own houses or stores on the street. This street was once the center of a bustling Palestinian city. Now the area is a ghost town with all the Palestinian stores shut down by the Israeli military.

We visited several villages on the West Bank whose land has been expropriated by the Israeli government and where their nonviolent protests against this injustice are met with rubber bullets and tear gas (we saw with our own eyes many empty canisters of tear gas made in the U.S.). We witnessed a demonstration in Nabi Saleh, watching soldiers in armored cars launch tear gas and shoot rubber bullets against children who were throwing stones. In this village, soldiers routinely enter homes in the middle of the night to arrest children, who are handcuffed and blindfolded, and taken to interrogation without the right to the presence of a parent or of consultation with a lawyer. The shocking abuse of children that we heard about from several sources, including Israeli lawyers, was particularly disturbing.

Our delegation also saw the rubble of Palestinian houses demolished by the Israeli authorities and waited in long lines at check points as Jewish motorists were waved through or passed unimpeded through special settler checkpoints.

We met with a young Palestinian man who played the part of Martin Luther King Jr. in a play about Dr. King’s life written by one of the people on our trip. This young man (like over 140,000 other West Bank Palestinians) has lost his residency rights as he went to Europe to study acting. Despite the fact that his family has lived in Jerusalem for generations, he is now unable to live in the city in which he was born. Yet I, or any other Jew, could become a citizen of Israel overnight and live in Jerusalem while enjoying many privileges available only to Jews.

Every day we were on the West Bank, we saw this pattern of discrimination: a systemic privileging of one ethnic group over another. Every day we heard about egregious human rights violations: Administrative detainees held in prison for years without any right to due process (a Palestinian due to talk to our group about prisoners was arrested two days before the presentation and is still in prison), massive land confiscation, separate roads and grave restrictions on movement.

As the Christian leaders’ letter indicated, all the violations we witnessed are made possible by unconditional American aid, in violation of American law. Rabbi Yoffie predicted that this statement may cause “an irreparable rift between U.S. Jews and Protestants.” It may be more accurate to say it may cause a rift between the American Jewish establishment and the Christian leaders who have until now been cowed with the warning that the price for “interfaith dialogue” is silence on Israel’s human rights violations.

But after these past several weeks, as I read the courageous Christian leaders’ letter and stood side-by-side with my interfaith colleagues on this remarkable delegation, I sense a new form of interfaith cooperation – one based in our mutual sacred imperative to “seek peace and pursue it.”

Rabbi Brian Walt is the Palestinian/Israeli Nonviolence Project Fellow of the Dorothy Cotton Institute. He was the executive director of Rabbis for Human Rights-North America from 2003-2008.

2 Responses to “Op-ed in Haaretz: Christian leaders cannot be cowed into silence over Israel’s abuses of human rights”

  1. Dear Rabbi Brian: good for you! what’s needed (especially in America) is for more Jews to come out and call out the horrific crimes of the Jewish state against the indigenous people of Palestine. I think it’s important to confront American Jewry’s support of Israel. One idea is to stand vigil in front of synagogues asking Jews to boycott Israel. What do you think? Could you lend your support to our BDS campaign: https://sites.google.com/site/cudivest/

    looking forward to your response: michael.rabb1@gmail.com

    Michael Rabb
    Boulder Colorado
    720-837-9674

  2. Mordechai Liebling said

    Wonderfully written piece. Thank you for telling us what you saw and experienced. It is important for moral leaders of all faiths to stand up for human rights and rabbis are not excluded. Our Christians colleagues must be supported in their calling for the U.S. to live up to its human rights obligations. Rabbi Mordechai Liebling

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